Eureka Country School

Eureka School, Fremont Township, Buchanan County, Iowa. This is the school my dad, Glen Williamson, attended for the first four and a half years of his education, from kindergarten to the second half of fourth grade! All seven children in Andrew and Rose Williamson’s family attended this school! And in fact, Andrew attended Eureka School in his childhood!Scan_Pic0032

Bessie, Floyd, Eva. Claude, Rose, Roy, Andrew,  Lewis is sitting, between Rose and Andrew. Glen had not been born yet or even expected! Eva & Glen

This picture is Eva and Glen about the time Glen would have started school.

Corina 170003

I think these pictures of Eureka School were taken in about 1948. The school building is being moved to a new location, that’s why it looks the way it does where there should be a foundation. I just wish I knew where it was moved to! Is it at a museum now? A museum would be the ideal location for this school!

DocFile (2) Left to right are: Glen, Floyd, Lewis, and Roy Williamson. Four brothers who all attended this school as children. There was one more brother, Claude, who also attended school here but he died as a young man, August 31, 1924. Claude was between Roy and Lewis in age. Bessie and Eva, the two girls in the family also attended school here!

This little document from Eureka School was a precious gift to me, given by my second cousin, Kay Hoffman, granddaughter of Bessie. It’s from the school year of 1902 and 1903. Julia G. Sowles was the teacher.

The president of the board was Andrew Williamson, my grandfather, who attended Eureka School as a child!  I assume Andrew’s brother, William, and sister, Jane, also attended here.

Eureka School was a good school! Here’s a short story my dad, Glen Williamson, wrote about the school, his teacher, and himself, at the time he attended school in Manchester.File Doc 3  This was taken from the book Corina/Glen Tracing Our Roots by Glen Williamson.

So there is some of the history of Eureka School, in Buchanan County, Iowa., where my dad and all his family began their education.

Manchester, Iowa Is In My Roots

Manchester, Iowa is on highway 20 halfway between Waterloo and Dubuque. It’s a lovely town in the county of Delaware and has very special meaning to me. Population: 5,053 (2016). Please read on…!        .

On June 27, 2018 Todd Piro a correspondent from Fox and Friends stopped in to Jude’s Cafe on Main Street in Manchester, Iowa! He visited with some of the men eating breakfast and drinking coffee! It was broadcast on Fox and Friends!

Jerry and I were watching Fox and Friends, as we do every morning! Imagine our surprise when this segment came on. Oh, are you wondering why it was actually exciting to us?

My dad, Glen Williamson, grew up in Manchester, Iowa! Dad was the youngest of seven children and was born on the family farm near Masonville, Iowa. When dad was nine years old, his dad, my grandfather, Andrew Williamson, retired at age 59 from farming. Andrew and Rose bought a lot, at 152 Gay Street in Manchester, where Andrew, built a house for them! They moved in on February 4, 1920. Dad was 10 and the only child still living at home. He built a large enough house for the rest of the children to know they could always come home and especially for holidays.                                                                                                Scan_Pic0006

That’s Grandma and Grandpa Williamson on the steps of the front porch,  in their old age. Grandpa died in 1942. Grandma died in 1948. The last time I was in Manchester the house was still there on Gay Street. Their car, a 1916 Saxon is parked in the driveway! He bought it new and never bought another car!

Dad had gone to the one room school house, through half of fourth grade, that all of his brothers and sisters had attended. But now he was enrolled in Manchester Elementary School. He was in fourth grade. He did well in school and was the only child in the family to attend and graduate from high school! Scan_Pic0011

This is a picture of Manchester High that Dad attended and graduated from.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was the end of Dad’s Manchester days except to return to visit. But later Dad’s sister and brother-in-law, Bessie and Earnie retired from farming and moved to Manchester. We visited them several times. They lived very close to Main Street in a lovely home.

Bessie & Earnie                                    Aunt Bessie lived to be 102 years old! When she was 100 years a party was held for her at the Good Neighbor Nursing Home in Manchester where she then lived. What a wonderful party it was! Relatives and friends came from California, Iowa, Michigan, Washington, Illinois, Colorado, Arkansas, Minnesota and Saskatchewan, Canada all to honor my Aunt Bessie! This is a snapshot of Aunt Bessie and me at her birthday party. There were lots of pictures taken.  Bessie & me         DocFile (2)  She received this birthday letter from Willard Scott on the Today Show at NBC News.  Aunt Bessie lived for just over another two years.                                                                                      Uncle Earnie and Aunt Bessie are both buried in Manchester Cemetery along with their son, my cousin, Fred. Bessie & Earnie graveFred Sommer grave                                                                                             So you can see Manchester, Iowa means a lot to me and that’s why I got so excited when Fox and Friends featured Manchester, Iowa on their show! If you’re ever in Iowa it’s a great little town!

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Scottish/Irish Roots

My dad’s side of my family came from Ireland and Scotland, so I have roots there!  This is a picture of my great-grandparents, William and Jane (Ramsey) Williamson, and their son, Andrew Stuart Williamson. William & Jennie Williamson (2) Actually, this picture was taken after they came to America. Andrew was born in Seaford, Delaware. He, eventually, became my grandfather! But going back further we can find out a little more about William and Jane in Ireland.

William’s family lived in Scotland where he was born in 1817. The family moved to Ireland while William was still a boy. They settled in or near Belfast. William became a baker.

Jane Ramsey was born in 1827 in or near Belfast. William and Jane met and were married in 1850. They had a baby girl, Mabel. I have no dates for Mabel, but she lived only a short time and was buried in a cemetery somewhere around Belfast.

The ‘great potato famine’ hit Ireland and hundreds of families left to make new lives in America. Heartbroken, William and Jane left Mabel in her grave and in 1864 boarded a ship for America. They lived first in Seaford, Delaware, where Jane gave birth to their second baby, Andrew Stewart, on September 22, 1865. When Andrew was a year old they made their way west to Iowa, where other family members had settled. William and Jane had two more children, William and Jenny.

William and Jane had moved from Iowa to Nebraska. Jane died and was buried in Bayard, Nebraska. Jane Ramsey Williamson (2)

William returned to Iowa and died in 1902. Grave of William Williamson (2)

—————————————————————–

Andrew grew up and married Rose Williams. They had seven children. Six children are pictured here with Rose and Andrew. Bessie, Floyd, Eva, Claude, Rose, Roy, Andrew, and Louis.

Scan_Pic0032Scan_Pic0108                                                    One more son joined the family on December 22, 1909.                                                         The youngest, Glen Edgar, shown here, became my father! So there, you now have a short version of my Scottish/Irish roots!

 

Small Isn’t All Bad – Less Is More

I love books. I love reading. I have actually read all night long when I was reading a novel I just

couldn’t put down! This shows a portion of my collection of books. I have favorite authors, of course. Grissom, Blackstock, Rivers, Williamson, just to name a few! Glen Williamson was my dad! I have all his books!

I’ve now reached the age I didn’t really think would ever arrive! Old Age! I need to downsize! Oh no, does that mean, get rid of my precious books?

I’ve done it! I’ve downsized my books! I’ve given many away! Some to family, some to friends here,  some to friends in far away places!

There is an organization that takes Christian books and makes them available to missionary workers and families. Christian Resources International is where boxes and boxes and boxes of my books, for all ages, went! It wasn’t so hard to give them away when I knew they were going to people who would read them and love them and be helped by some of them and who couldn’t, otherwise, get them! And they’ll be going all over the world!

I no longer have my book shelves in my reading room. I no longer have my reading room! We’ve moved the shelves upstairs to the loft. So here is my reading corner!

I even had room for some antique games and toys from Jerry’s childhood days. A Roy Rogers coloring book! Monopoly, a jar of Marbles, Dominos, Tinker Toys, and a game of Conflict. The beautiful doll was a gift from my daughter, Pam, years ago, but not an antique yet! The parasols are from Taiwan.

New Library

So the downsizing has begun! My books, for the most part, are alphabetized by the author.

Book case 1 These are  some antique books I can’t part with. Some are: Dick and Jane readers, I started out learning to read, in Des Moines, Iowa. Jerry and Alice readers, Friendly Village and If I Were Going, I had in Covington, Oklahoma.

Jerry made this bookcase when he was in high school in the early 50’s! On top of the bookcase is the Singer sewing machine my mother received as a gift when she was a teenager. She made all my clothes and my sisters on this machine! A darning bulb is beside the sewing machine. Mother taught me to darn socks with it! Today, of course, we throw  holey socks away and buy new!

Having grandchildren, I have to save some of my kid books. I gave a lot of them away but I kept some favorites. Most of them were my own kids books when they were young.

The Bremen-town Musicians I have read to all of my grandchildren. They got to hold the statue of the Rooster, Cat, Dog, and Donkey while I read the book to them. They loved it and begged to have me read to them over and over!

So, the next stage of downsizing needs to begin. Oh dear…

 

Happy Birthday, Rob

Happy Birthday, Robert Glen.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I can’t find a recent picture of just you! But this is a good one of both you and Jessica.

You were named after both of your grandfathers! They were both good men so you are honored to bear their names. You didn’t get to meet Robert because he died, from cancer, in 1951. He would have been pleased to have a grandson named for him. You did get to know Glen. He was a happy and proud grandpa to have you bear his name.

Your dad and I are both very proud of you. You’ve taken on a huge responsibility adopting two children, giving you a family of six. We wish we could celebrate your birthday with you. Happy, Happy Birthday!

Heavenly Father, thank You for Rob! Please give him an extra sense of Your presence today. Keep him safe as he drives, alert as he works, loving as a husband and dad, ever-growing in his walk with You. He’s a fine man, husband, father, son, brother, uncle, nephew, friend, and neighbor. I love Rob so much and You love him even more.

 

Fun Loving Dad

My dad was a baby,  Scan_Pic0108  who started out racing with the doctor! Dad won! The doctor arrived at the Iowa farmhouse after he was born! My dad was a boy, who lived on a farm until he was ten, then his dad retired, built a house in town, Scan_Pic0006 and Dad became a city boy. You can see their  1916 Saxon, which my Grandpa bought brand new!  My dad was a brother, the youngest with six older siblings. My dad was a college student until the financial crash in 1919. He was going to be a lawyer!

My dad was a cook’s helper and later a chef. Scan_Pic0103 Dad’s the cook in front.

He was a husband 3905_1067392805078_6714086_n and a  daddy. Scan_Pic0107 He was Dad 45 a minister, pastor, evangelist, and a writer, Scan_Pic0254 He published 13 books!  And he was an executive.

My dad was an actor! He portrayed B. T. Roberts, Glen as BT Roberts the founder of Free Methodism.

My dad was a world traveler, having traveled to various countries in four continents: North America, South America, Europe, and Asia. Because of all his experiences and knowledge he was bestowed an honorary Doctors Degree of Letters!

Then he became a student again, earning his BA and his MA at age 70!

In all of these roles. he still loved to have just plain fun. Scan_Pic0127  This was in the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago! Dad & Mother relaxingDad and Mother relaxing in the park!

He walked me down the aisle and gave me away. Wedding June 13 '59 001  Then he walked up onto the platform and married Jerry and me! wedding-day J & AGo-cart0098  Here he’s having fun riding my son’s go-cart! Anita & Jerry Merry-G-Round 79 Portland0001  He’s riding a Merry-Go-Round! Scan_Pic0059  He’s letting Annie drive his scooter!  Yes, I have many fond memories of my dad. He was a man with a mission…who loved to have fun! He lived four days shy of his 96th birthday. I loved my dad.

Dad’s Roast Pig Story

This is a story my dad told many times. It’s a true story and he’s Glen.

Dad’s Pig Story

Glen’s first job in a hotel kitchen was as a cook’s helper. He bought a white cap, white apron, neckerchief and Scan_Pic0102 seersucker pants. It was a large hotel, where they served lots of private parties. Jack was the head chef and he was tough!

A dinner was scheduled for one of the most prominent families in the city. It was a dinner celebrating the 80th birthday of the former editor of the city newspaper. Everything had to be perfect.  A roast pig was the main entrée on the menu. Glen was scheduled to be helper of the cook who was in charge of roasting the pig. It was the first time either one of them had roasted a pig.  The pig was delivered to the hotel kitchen. He had been butchered, but the head and feet were still on him. But he was  too long, even kitty-cornered to fit in the roasting pan! The cook said to Glen, “Hey, let’s do something a little different! What if we set him up on his haunches’? I think Jack would like that!” They’d do anything to please Jack, just so they could keep their jobs!  So the pig was set up in the roasting pan. Some blocks of wood were set up under his chest to hold him up. Another block of wood was in his mouth, so they could put an apple in later.  They cocked his head just as they wanted it, but his ears looked out of character, hanging down like pigs ears do! So they took skewers and stuck them down into his ears and pinned them up so his ears were sticking straight up. He was the most alert looking pig! He looked like the dog in the Victor advertising, listening to his master’s voice! They, very carefully, shoved the pan, with the pig sitting up, into the oven.

The cook told Glen, “It’s your job to use a ladle and baste the pig every half hour. “We have to do a good job with this pig, or we could lose our jobs!” So, every thirty minutes Glen pulled the pan out and basted the pig. He enjoyed it and the pig was looking good! It took most of the day to roast the pig.

When it got near time for the banquet everyone was busy and somehow the pig got neglected! But It was time now to get the pig ready, to take him out of the roaster pan and put the apple in his mouth. As Glen opened the big oven door, SMOKE came rolling out! And oh, the poor pig! His ears had been dangerously close to the top of the oven. They were gone! They had crumbled away like crisp bacon! The sticks were still there, but even they were burned. But, that wasn’t the worst! The worst thing was that the skin on his back had bust open and had left a gaping hole in the middle of his back! Grease was popping up out of the hole and his backbone was exposed! The cook shook his head and said we’d better call Jack.”

When Jack got there, he was so angry he couldn’t talk! He just stared at that poor burnt pig!

Well, over in the bake shop was an old man, Bill, who had been a chef, in his day, but now he was old and worked in the bake shop. But he was an artist! He did the ice sculpturing, decorating of the cakes and so on. They had been to him before when they needed help fixing something up. Jack was actually jealous of him,  but now he ordered us to fetch Old Bill. Someone ran to the bakeshop and told Bill to come quickly!

Old Bill came walking over, taking his time. Jack wanted to reach out and grab him! When Bill got there he took a big long fork, stuck it into the pig’s back in several places and then said, “It’s done.” Jack jumped up, waving his arms in the air, “I don’t care if he’s done…what are we going to do about that hole in his back?!”

Bill calmly told them to take the pig into his bakery. He covered a large oval shaped plank with white, fluffy mashed potatoes. They, very carefully, set the pig up, on his haunches, in the middle of it. He, then, filled a large pastry bag, with mashed  potatoes, like one used to decorate a cake with icing! The first thing he did was work on his ears. He pulled the skewers out and threw them away. Then he cut out some ears from heavy brown wrapping paper, put them in place, and covered those ears with mashed potatoes! Then he worked on the face to make it look attractive. He put cranberries in the eye sockets! He put the apple in his mouth! The pig was looking good!

But what was Bill going to do with that hole in his back? They soon found out! He took his big pastry bag filled with mashed potatoes and made the most beautiful saddle right over that big hole! Oh, he was the most beautiful roast pig they’d ever seen! In fact, it was the most beautiful piece of culinary art they’d ever seen!

Glen and the other three men, carefully carried the pig into the dining room. Old Bill followed along behind, with his pastry bag, ready to fix up any part they messed up.  The party was ushered in. They had been to lots of parties and thought they’d seen everything! But they were in for a big surprise!

When they came in and saw that pig sitting right up on his haunches, beautiful saddle on his back, beautiful ears standing straight up, apple in his mouth, they were amazed!  “Oh, Father,” one of the daughter’s exclaimed, “Look what they did for your birthday!” The old man came over and shook his head. He never dreamed they would do anything like that for him!

It was soon time to carve the pig.  Jack had put on a clean apron and cap, found his sharpest carving knife, and was ready to carve the pig. He was smiling from ear to ear! He carved away but stayed away from the saddle on his back! When it was all over, he was given a big tip! In those days, money was scarce but they thought he deserved a big tip! He kept it, too!!! He didn’t even share it with Old Bill!

This is a true story and happened in about 1929. My dad was trying to work his way through college. Then came the big financial crash! That ended his college career. He was fortunate to keep working in various hotels in the kitchen and eventually became a chef! A very good chef!

Years later, after a life-changing experience with God, Glen, my dad, became a minister and this story became a favorite among his listeners, especially young people.

It was a perfect illustration for how God can take a ruined life and make a masterpiece out of it! God can and does!