Days Gone By… Part 2

I, like so many of you, have wonderful memories and art to remember my family by. img_2683 This little chicken, made by punching holes in a sheet of metal, was made by one of my great-grandfathers!                                              img_2687 This bookend was made by one of my grandfathers! There are two of them, books stand between them, and I’m using them. I love them!

IMG_2695      The Lord’s Prayer was embroidered, by my mother, as a gift to my grandparents for their golden anniversary on January 1,  1940! Today it’s hanging in my living room.

IMG_2693 This rolling pin was made by Jerry, my husband, in his high school shop class. I have many more of his projects: a beautiful hope chest; a beautiful gun cabinet, which we’ve given to our daughter and husband; a bookcase; and several more.

I’m wondering what will become of these treasures when I’m gone. Will my children or grandchildren treasure them?

Do you have antique treasures you’re keeping? Have you shared them? I hope I’m not alone in this…!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Days Gone By…

I’m a saver. Well, just look what I’ve saved…!

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Haleigh’s hand about 20 years ago!
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Christy’s hand about 46 years ago!
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My hand about 75 years ago!

These three little hand prints! The last one is the oldest! It’s mine! It doesn’t give the date. But my name is on the bottom. The first one is the youngest. It’s my granddaughter’s, Haleigh! It’s so small! She went to a pre-school and I think that’s where her’s was made. The one in the middle is my youngest daughter, Christy! I need to refresh the paint. I think her’s was done in kindergarten. I wish I had one of all my children, five, and all my grandchildren, 15, and my great-grandson! Do you have hand prints or other items to remember and keep?                                                           

My Big Brother and Me part 2

In 1950 we moved to Elk Run Heights just outside Waterloo, Iowa. Waterloo had a baseball team, the Waterloo White Hawks, a farm club of the White Sox. We loved baseball. That year the baseball club came up with a solution to a problem they’d had for years. Kids would line up along the fence surrounding the ball field to watch through the knot holes, probably making new ‘knot holes’ just so they could watch the game. In 1950 they advertised t-shirts that read across the back, KNOT HOLER! Mother bought each of us one. Richard and I, especially, loved to go to the games and as long as we wore our t-shirts we got in free!

One game night we had a dilemma…it was Wednesday evening. We always went to church on Wednesday evening. In fact, we went to church twice on Sunday and to every Wednesday evening  prayer meeting. We never missed. Oh boy, this evening Richard and I really wanted to go to the ballgame. We begged and coaxed.  Mother finally agreed but…we had to go to prayer meeting first and each give a testimony! We agreed. For some unknown reason prayer meeting was held in a home that evening instead of at the church. Harvey and Minnie Nichols were hosting the service. They happened to live in the same direction as the stadium! We arrived on time. First we sang some hymns, then Bro. Nichols, prayed. Oh, it was the longest prayer!!! Finally it was time for testimonies. Richard jumped to his feet  and declared his love for Jesus, I immediately followed him with “I love the Lord with all my heart!” Then we politely excused ourselves and went to the ballgame! I don’t remember who won the game but it was an evening I’ve never forgotten!

In my seventh year of school and Richard’s 11th year he went to South Dakota to Wessington Springs Jr College and High School. Then someone graciously paid Lorraine’s way to also attend the same school. Our life at home changed dramatically with only Billy and myself at home with Mother. Dad was traveling most of the time as an evangelist. This picture is Richard and Lorraine, brother and sister, who became great friends while away at school!Richard & Lorraine

The school year went by quickly and in August we moved to Des Moines, Iowa. Dad had been appointed pastor of First Free Methodist Church. Lorraine returned to South Dakota to school but Richard stayed home with us in Des Moines. He had decided to join the Army.

I’ll never forget the night before he was to leave early the next morning. My bedroom was right next to his. I wanted to go to him to tell him good-bye, I wanted to give him a hug. I wanted him to know I loved him, I would miss him and I’d be praying for him. Our family wasn’t a demonstrative family. We never hugged or said I love you. But that night I wanted to so badly. The Korean War was going on and I didn’t know what that would mean for him. I tossed and turned all night but I didn’t go to him. I just couldn’t risk being rejected by my big brother. It seems ridiculous now but that was then.

Richard was stationed at Camp Gordon, Augusta, Georgia for his entire three years! Mother and Dad and Billy and I took a trip down to Georgia for his basic training graduation. I was so proud of him. I was a teenager now and he told me some of the guys were asking him who the pretty young girl was with his family. He said he told them I was his sister and they’d better not bother me! Then he gave me some big-brotherly advise about guys and how I should be careful! This was the first of a few big brother talks he gave me through my teen years… Scan_Pic0168

In the army Richard became a radio communications instructor; got married; had a son… Life goes on but life is not always fair. The marriage didn’t last but his son did! Richard Anthony Williamson, my nephew!

I remember the day like it was yesterday. Richard had come home to seek counsel from Dad and Mother. I didn’t know he was coming. I walked through the living room, Richard was sitting on the sofa. We looked at each other…his eyes looked wild! What was wrong? Later Mother explained to me what was happening. I was heart broken for Richard. I cried, sobbed, cried some more; praying all the while. Divorce! How could this be happening to my wonderful big brother?

Richard had graduated from De Vry Technical Institute in Chicago.

I was a freshman at Wessington Springs Jr College. Richard returned to begin his college career. It was very nice for me to have my big brother so close. We didn’t spend a lot of time together but just knowing he was near was a comfort to me.

The summer of 1958 I met Jerry and we fell in love! So I decided to transfer to Spring Arbor College in Michigan. We were married the next summer. Richard was an usher in our wedding. This picture is our family: Bill, Richard, little Christine, Lorraine, me, Jerry, Mother and Dad. Dad married us. Bill and Richard were ushers, Christine was flower girl, Lorraine was matron of honor, I was the bride!Lorraine 010

Then Richard married again. He and his new wife moved to Spring Arbor so he could go back to school. We got together several different times. We had three children by then, Pammy, Teddy and Timmy. They had a son, Andy.

Richard is a good actor and while he was attending Spring Arbor College he played the part of Silas Marner in the play of the same name. Jerry and I drove down to see the play and were so impressed. Richard was an excellent actor.

From the time I was very young I knew Richard was going to be a pastor. I don’t know how I knew, I just knew. While they were living in Spring Arbor Richard began to feel this call. They moved to Iowa where he became pastor of the Knoxville, Iowa Free Methodist Church. A baby girl was born to them, Susan Diane. We went to visit them while they were living there.

Then they moved to Walla Walla, Washington where he pastored the Free Methodist Church. He also worked with teens who needed help. It led him to write a short book, El Shaddi.

While living there Richard also completed his college work and graduated from Walla Walla College in ‘69 with a degree in English and a minor in Religion. I was very proud of him.

Another move was made, this time to Golden, Colorado where he pastored the Free Methodist Church. The conference superintendent was our own father, Glen Williamson. We went to visit them and had the wonderful, unforgettable experience of going to The Flying W Ranch. We enjoyed it as much as all our children, Pammy, Teddy, Andy, Timmy and Susan.

But trouble was brewing again and again there was a divorce. My heart was saddened again for my big brother. As I prayed for him I questioned God, “Why, Lord? Why?”

This divorce, of course, meant the end of his pastoral ministry in the Free Methodist Church. I was saddened. He was a good pastor.

He continued living in Colorado, moving to Greeley. He had several jobs, he was successful at every job he had! A printing shop, The Pony Express. He headed up a ministry for troubled boys. He managed a home for senior citizens. He always left the job a better position then when he started with it.

I mentioned before that he was a good actor. The Hollywood movie Centennial was being made. Richard tried out as an extra and got the job! He was a minister in one scene and…

Then he met Cookie. They married and a year later Heidi Ann was born!

He still acted in plays. He was often the leading man.

Richard began attending the Methodist Church in Greeley, often filling in when the pastor was gone. Then he was hired as Pastor. 17 years over 3 different times.

Richard loves old radios and has collected and repaired them for years. He also has had a radio program “Oldies” for 22 years! At present he’s on The Pirate Radio station in Greeley, Colorado every Sunday evening, 5:30 to 11:30 PM. He plays music from the 40’s and 50’s and old programs like Fibber Magee and Molly, Inner Sanctum, Jack Benny, and so many more.

Richard is a busy man at 84 years of age! He just had a birthday! He’s a husband, grandfather, and great grandfather! He also makes up cross word puzzles and other word puzzles for the Greeley News!

I’m very proud of my big brother! There is a lot more I could have written but I didn’t. I wish we lived closer but we don’t. I’m thankful for telephones and internet and mail. Today it’s very easy to stay in touch. I love you, Richard!

My Big Brother and Me

My big brother, Richard Glen, is four years older than I am. He’s just older enough for me to have always looked up to him. He’s always been there for me. 2414_1029994670148_9430_n

My very first recollection was when I was about three or four years old. We lived in a house that didn’t have enough bedrooms! So Richard and I shared a bedroom. I went to sleep every night knowing my big brother was in a bed near by and I felt safe!

When we were kids, back in the 40’s, he had a tall stack of comic books! He was very possessive of them. We, my sister, Lorraine, younger brother, Billy and I couldn’t just pick up a comic book and start reading. Oh no, we had to ask permission to read one! Then we had to put it back on the pile when we finished! I’m sure our mother appreciated the fact that Richard’s comic books were never just laying around waiting to be picked up!kids 1947 (2)  I was just seven years old, and he, 11, called with a gruff voice, “Anita!”

Oh no, what did I do now?

“See my comic books?” he asked sternly.

I nodded, searching through my mind, had I sneaked one to read lately? I don’t think so…I couldn’t remember…

“Well, pick out which ever one you want to read!” he ordered with a friendly grin! “But…take care of it and put it back when you’re done!” OH, okay, I could do that!

Richard was very responsible. From the time he was in sixth grade he always had a job! Covington, Oklahoma: sweeping the floor of the newspaper print shop and recycling lead free linotype cymbals! East Peoria, Illinois: an early morning paper route. Waterloo, Iowa: a grocery store carrying groceries and stocking shelves.

One year for Christmas Dad and Mother gave Richard a new, used Schwinn bicycle. He was so excited. It was bright red, it didn’t really matter that it didn’t have fenders. But, because Richard worked and made a little money, he was able to buy new fenders. Shiny chrome fenders!

One day, some boys after school, were picking on him, trying to pull his bike away from him! I saw them and was horrified! They couldn’t do that to my big brother! I ran toward the boys. When I reached them I started hitting and kicking, yelling all the while, “Leave my brother alone! Get away from him, That’s his bike!”

I don’t remember how it turned out. I do remember the reprimanding I got from Richard, later at home. He told me he could fight his own battles, and I was never, under any circumstances, ever to fight for him again!

When we moved to East Peoria, Illinois in 1948 Richard again went to work! This time he was hired as a paperboy delivering the early morning paper! He had to get up very early every morning! I got up early a couple of times to go on his route with him. It wasn’t even light out, but he was faithful and his customers appreciated him. I felt proud making the rounds with him. I should have gone with him more often…but it was soooo hard to get up soooo early!

Richard, teenagerRichard had a dark room where he developed pictures from our Kodak brownie cameras! He patiently explained the whole process to me. I was impressed! He was so intelligent!

But Richard had a problem. He stuttered. He just recently told me how he overcame this embarrassing, uncontrollable problem. We moved often which meant new schools, new friends, new jobs, new church, etc. During our childhood we never lived in a house longer than three years! It was hard on all of us kids but it was our life. It was hardest on Richard though because of his stuttering. Some letters were harder to say then others. He could hardly get out the letter R, so he took the nickname, Dick, although he’s always been Richard to Mother and me.

But Richard had a teacher in East Peoria who recognized his problem of stuttering because she’d had the problem when she was a girl and a teacher helped her overcome it. She talked to Richard about it and offered to help him, if he would let her.

Thankfully, he did let her and what a difference she made for him!  No more stuttering after a few months of working with her. He ended up with an A in English. Later in life he became an actor, preacher, radio announcer, etc.!

Continued as part 2.

 

 

 

September 4

September 4 was an important day in my life three times. I’ll write about two of them here.

September 4, 2012. My phone rang late that night. I gladly answered it, knowing it would be Lorraine, my sister. We often talked late at night because there were no interruptions! We could talk as long as we wanted to and we often talked for a couple of hours or longer! We talked about our childhood, our parents and brothers and sisters-in-law, our grandchildren, our feelings, our belief in God…and sometimes, non-belief. We both felt better when we hung up, knowing we both had shared our true feelings, knowing we both understood where we each stood on issues, and feeling a little closer to each other and to God.  Lorraine

But this night when I answered with a cheery hello, it wasn’t Lorraine. It was my brother, Richard! Well, that was a surprise, but I enjoy talking with him too. Then he told me why he was calling. Lorraine had died that day! No! No! It can’t be! What? How? When? Why? No! Not Lorraine!

How many times had we laughed about the longevity in our genes! We both hoped we’d keep our good health and clear minds as we aged. Our parents did so we should too! She was a widow and one year she flew from Oregon to Michigan to visit me! I was thrilled as we had a great time together.

We’d been so close as children but had grown apart when we were teenagers and then as young wives and mothers we were so busy and so many miles apart we just didn’t keep up with a close relationship, like we should have. I’m actually ashamed…

But now we were both retired and had time and needed each other so we spent hours on the phone late at night. We sometimes talked about death. I assured her of my relationship with Jesus and my belief in God. She had many questions and I felt her belief begin to blossom again. We even talked about death but it was a long way off and we needed to have a close relationship with God as time was going by so quickly. She told me she had forsaken her faith years ago and I assured her I’d be praying for her because God loved her. Then one night she told me she believed in God again. She felt Him with her. She wanted to be even closer to Him. I continued to pray for her daily. Now, suddenly, she was gone. But our conversations and prayers were not in vain. I believe she’s in heaven and I’ll be with her one day.

September 4, 2013. Mother, who had died on August 25, at 99 1/2 years, was buried beside Dad, in Stanwood, Washington. We struggled, debated, questioned and finally decided to have Mother’s ashes buried on September 4. Lorraine had died one year earlier on September 4. It was a distance from Castle Rock, Colorado where she’d been living and had died. Everyone had a distance to travel to get there and then to get back home, for some many hundreds of miles. Lorraine was also honored in the short burial service for Mother. It was a painful day.                                                                                                            Lorraine & Dog       OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA     6038 (2) (1)

September 4, 2018. The pain is still in my heart. It hasn’t gone away. It’s just as vivid as in 2012 and 2013. I loved Lorraine and I loved Mother. Someday I’ll be with both of them, when my day comes to leave this earth. I love you, Lorraine! I love Mother!

 

 

Honoring Lewis Hood, WWI

On this Memorial Day 2018 I bring honor to all those who have given their lives for our freedom. I, specifically, bring honor to my second cousin, Lewis Hood. Lewis Hood Graduation   Lewis was my dad’s cousin, making him my second cousin. He was killed in the Argonne Forest in France at the very end of World War I! Of course I never met him. He was killed on October 10, 1918. My dad was only ten years old! But Dad admired him and was looking forward, along with the rest of the family,  to Lewis coming home from the war. ??????????????

Eureka Country School

Eureka School, Fremont Township, Buchanan County, Iowa. This is the school my dad, Glen Williamson, attended for the first four and a half years of his education, from kindergarten to the second half of fourth grade! All seven children in Andrew and Rose Williamson’s family attended this school! And in fact, Andrew attended Eureka School in his childhood!Scan_Pic0032

Bessie, Floyd, Eva. Claude, Rose, Roy, Andrew,  Lewis is sitting, between Rose and Andrew. Glen had not been born yet or even expected! Eva & Glen

This picture is Eva and Glen about the time Glen would have started school.

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I think these pictures of Eureka School were taken in about 1948. The school building is being moved to a new location, that’s why it looks the way it does where there should be a foundation. I just wish I knew where it was moved to! Is it at a museum now? A museum would be the ideal location for this school!

DocFile (2) Left to right are: Glen, Floyd, Lewis, and Roy Williamson. Four brothers who all attended this school as children. There was one more brother, Claude, who also attended school here but he died as a young man, August 31, 1924. Claude was between Roy and Lewis in age. Bessie and Eva, the two girls in the family also attended school here!

This little document from Eureka School was a precious gift to me, given by my second cousin, Kay Hoffman, granddaughter of Bessie. It’s from the school year of 1902 and 1903. Julia G. Sowles was the teacher.

The president of the board was Andrew Williamson, my grandfather, who attended Eureka School as a child!  I assume Andrew’s brother, William, and sister, Jane, also attended here.

Eureka School was a good school! Here’s a short story my dad, Glen Williamson, wrote about the school, his teacher, and himself, at the time he attended school in Manchester.File Doc 3  This was taken from the book Corina/Glen Tracing Our Roots by Glen Williamson.

So there is some of the history of Eureka School, in Buchanan County, Iowa., where my dad and all his family began their education.