My Big Brother and Me

My big brother, Richard Glen, is four years older than I am. He’s just older enough for me to have always looked up to him. He’s always been there for me. 2414_1029994670148_9430_n

My very first recollection was when I was about three or four years old. We lived in a house that didn’t have enough bedrooms! So Richard and I shared a bedroom. I went to sleep every night knowing my big brother was in a bed near by and I felt safe!

When we were kids, back in the 40’s, he had a tall stack of comic books! He was very possessive of them. We, my sister, Lorraine, younger brother, Billy and I couldn’t just pick up a comic book and start reading. Oh no, we had to ask permission to read one! Then we had to put it back on the pile when we finished! I’m sure our mother appreciated the fact that Richard’s comic books were never just laying around waiting to be picked up!kids 1947 (2)  I was just seven years old, and he, 11, called with a gruff voice, “Anita!”

Oh no, what did I do now?

“See my comic books?” he asked sternly.

I nodded, searching through my mind, had I sneaked one to read lately? I don’t think so…I couldn’t remember…

“Well, pick out which ever one you want to read!” he ordered with a friendly grin! “But…take care of it and put it back when you’re done!” OH, okay, I could do that!

Richard was very responsible. From the time he was in sixth grade he always had a job! Covington, Oklahoma: sweeping the floor of the newspaper print shop and recycling lead free linotype cymbals! East Peoria, Illinois: an early morning paper route. Waterloo, Iowa: a grocery store carrying groceries and stocking shelves.

One year for Christmas Dad and Mother gave Richard a new, used Schwinn bicycle. He was so excited. It was bright red, it didn’t really matter that it didn’t have fenders. But, because Richard worked and made a little money, he was able to buy new fenders. Shiny chrome fenders!

One day, some boys after school, were picking on him, trying to pull his bike away from him! I saw them and was horrified! They couldn’t do that to my big brother! I ran toward the boys. When I reached them I started hitting and kicking, yelling all the while, “Leave my brother alone! Get away from him, That’s his bike!”

I don’t remember how it turned out. I do remember the reprimanding I got from Richard, later at home. He told me he could fight his own battles, and I was never, under any circumstances, ever to fight for him again!

When we moved to East Peoria, Illinois in 1948 Richard again went to work! This time he was hired as a paperboy delivering the early morning paper! He had to get up very early every morning! I got up early a couple of times to go on his route with him. It wasn’t even light out, but he was faithful and his customers appreciated him. I felt proud making the rounds with him. I should have gone with him more often…but it was soooo hard to get up soooo early!

Richard, teenagerRichard had a dark room where he developed pictures from our Kodak brownie cameras! He patiently explained the whole process to me. I was impressed! He was so intelligent!

But Richard had a problem. He stuttered. He just recently told me how he overcame this embarrassing, uncontrollable problem. We moved often which meant new schools, new friends, new jobs, new church, etc. During our childhood we never lived in a house longer than three years! It was hard on all of us kids but it was our life. It was hardest on Richard though because of his stuttering. Some letters were harder to say then others. He could hardly get out the letter R, so he took the nickname, Dick, although he’s always been Richard to Mother and me.

But Richard had a teacher in East Peoria who recognized his problem of stuttering because she’d had the problem when she was a girl and a teacher helped her overcome it. She talked to Richard about it and offered to help him, if he would let her.

Thankfully, he did let her and what a difference she made for him!  No more stuttering after a few months of working with her. He ended up with an A in English. Later in life he became an actor, preacher, radio announcer, etc.!

Continued as part 2.

 

 

 

What A Difference A Day Makes

The day was all planned. I would be joining four other friends, in our small group, to go to Bay City to pay our respects to our friends, John and Jan, over the death of their sister-in-law. Jerry was staying home. John and Jan seemed so pleased we had taken the time and made the effort to support them in their grief.

As we left, to go home, we decided to stop at a pizza shop, only a few blocks away from the funeral home. We parked across the street from the pizza shop.  No cars were coming so we jaywalked across the street. When I picked up my foot to step over the curb, alas, I didn’t pick it up high enough!!! I felt myself stumbling and going down! I put my hand out in front of me to break my fall. Well, I didn’t break my fall and I did break my wrist!!! I knew it was broken by the way my hand was hanging from my wrist! My friends helped me get up.

But I suddenly felt myself getting faint and cried, “I’m going to pass out!” They quickly helped me lie down on the cement sidewalk. Sharon called Jerry. John called 911. Jerry insisted they take me to Midland Hospital instead of Bay City Hospital. Our wonderful friends met us at Midland hospital. With the help of our friend, Larry, Jerry met us all there. Many hours later after lots of tests, x-rays, and a soft cast put on my arm, we were sent home along with lots of instructions.

The next day, Friday, our friend, Rose, brought supper to us! Oh how wonderful. As we visited she told Jerry and me details about my fall that I didn’t know or didn’t remember! One detail was that her husband, Larry, sat down on the cement and put my head on his lap, as a pillow! I didn’t know that! How sweet of him!

Saturday morning I became very sick. Extremely sick! Jerry didn’t know what to do for me. He called 911. So I was taken to Midland Hospital for the second time in three days! This whole mishap was quite an ordeal! But we have such good friends! John and Jan brought a delicious meal to us and then Creston and Sharon brought supper to us! Wow! We ate good!!!

But it was two weeks before I could see the surgeon! He said it was a bad break and I’d need surgery. So a steel plate, the shape of a T, was put in my wrist with seven screws! Two weeks of a soft cast and then two weeks of a hard cast! Oh what misery!

It’s now been almost three months since I broke my wrist and I’m still in occupational therapy! Please, whatever you do, don’t break your wrist! Of course it doesn’t help that I’m almost 80 years old! I guess the older we are the harder it is to heal! Whatever would I do without my granddaughter helping me out for the summer!

What a difference a day makes! It can be a great day with family and friends. It can be a lonely day. It can be a day where tragedy happens, or a fall and a broken bone.

What A Difference A Day Makes!

 

My Scottish/Irish Roots

My dad’s side of my family came from Ireland and Scotland, so I have roots there!  This is a picture of my great-grandparents, William and Jane (Ramsey) Williamson, and their son, Andrew Stuart Williamson. William & Jennie Williamson (2) Actually, this picture was taken after they came to America. Andrew was born in Seaford, Delaware. He, eventually, became my grandfather! But going back further we can find out a little more about William and Jane in Ireland.

William’s family lived in Scotland where he was born in 1817. The family moved to Ireland while William was still a boy. They settled in or near Belfast. William became a baker.

Jane Ramsey was born in 1827 in or near Belfast. William and Jane met and were married in 1850. They had a baby girl, Mabel. I have no dates for Mabel, but she lived only a short time and was buried in a cemetery somewhere around Belfast.

The ‘great potato famine’ hit Ireland and hundreds of families left to make new lives in America. Heartbroken, William and Jane left Mabel in her grave and in 1864 boarded a ship for America. They lived first in Seaford, Delaware, where Jane gave birth to their second baby, Andrew Stewart, on September 22, 1865. When Andrew was a year old they made their way west to Iowa, where other family members had settled. William and Jane had two more children, William and Jenny.

William and Jane had moved from Iowa to Nebraska. Jane died and was buried in Bayard, Nebraska. Jane Ramsey Williamson (2)

William returned to Iowa and died in 1902. Grave of William Williamson (2)

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Andrew grew up and married Rose Williams. They had seven children. Six children are pictured here with Rose and Andrew. Bessie, Floyd, Eva, Claude, Rose, Roy, Andrew, and Louis.

Scan_Pic0032Scan_Pic0108                                                    One more son joined the family on December 22, 1909.                                                         The youngest, Glen Edgar, shown here, became my father! So there, you now have a short version of my Scottish/Irish roots!

 

Ring…Ring…Hello?

Telephone. A luxury I’ve had for most of my life. Telephones have come a long way! Let me begin by retelling my dad’s exciting telephone experience.

Dad was born in 1909. His family had their first telephone. They were on a party line, of course. The number of rings had to be counted to know when an incoming call was for them! I don’t know how many rings meant a call for them.

Eight long rings meant important news was being broadcast across the party line!               In 1918 good news came across the wires telling families World War I had ended!

July 5, 1919, there came eight lon-n-ng rings again! This time to tell everyone to look in the sky, south. There my dad and others in the family had their first sighting of an airplane, just a tiny speck, moving steadily along!

Dad’s sister, Bessie, was seventeen years older than Dad! She went to school through eighth grade, then she got a job as a telephone operator until her marriage to her young boyfriend, Earnie!  619px-texasrichardson_telephoneexchangeoperator-2 This isn’t a picture of Aunt Bessie but I imagine she looked something like this on the job!

An early telephone.antique-telephone-1-2

The first telephone below was in the farmhouse where my mother grew up in northern Iowa! It is now in my brother’s kitchen. The board on the box at the bottom has been replaced, as you can see. But my mother remembered the phone well from when she was just a girl. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA   momonoldtelephone3-16-08   This is Mother, in her old age, pretending like she listening to someone on the phone of her youth!antique-telephone-in-georgia-2  This phone is in the history building in Winder, Georgia! I was given permission to post it here.

When I was a little girl, we had a phone most of the time. When Dad was a pastor, he needed a phone. Many emergency calls came to him. Black phone (2)  Some years he traveled and my parents couldn’t afford a telephone!

Jerry and I were married in 1959. We had a phone like the one in this latest picture. It started out being a party line with eight people on our line. It was very soon cut down to four people…then later, two people. We were very conservative. Long distance calls were made very seldom. Of course, when we had a new baby, calls were made to spread the news!  I’ll never forget the day Jerry told me, in the early 70’s, that I should start calling my parents once a month and have a nice visit with them! So I did! Black phone (2)  In the eighties, we finally got a private line! It was wonderful! Calling became normal and usual. With five children, how could it not!

I was hired by the school system to call the substitute teachers for the secondary schools in our city. A new private phone was installed in my kitchen! Blue telephone  It was very similar to this one! Yes, I picked out a blue one to go with my kitchen! The big difference of this picture is that my new school phone had push button numbers instead of a dial! I loved it. But, it was for school calls and paid for by the school system so our family still used the old black phone, most of the time. There were exceptions!

When we built our new log home twenty years ago in 1997 we bought a new phone with an answering machine! Oh yes! I wish I had a picture of it! We didn’t have to miss any messages! We also bought an old looking phone and hung on the wall in the kitchen. It worked but, of course, not anymore. new-old-phone-2  Now it just looks old-fashioned!

All this to bring us to today! Of course, businesses still have telephones and a few people still have a land line with a phone connected.

We don’t. We have our cell phones. But even so we’re not up-to-date! Jerry still has his flip-phone! jerry-on-phone-2 He says it works fine. I have my iphone. img_0052-4  What a difference in telephones today! I have instant access with anyone anywhere! I can text or message or talk at any hour of the day or night. My daughter, in Ireland, and I message or talk to each other whenever we want to! It sounds like she’s next door! I have friends all over the world and it’s wonderful to be in contact with them! My phone gives me the weather anywhere in the world, instantly! International and national news comes over my iphone! Pictures? My phone has a camera and I can even edit my pictures before I post them! I carry my phone with me all the time. I charge it at night while I’m sleeping.

This morning one of my sons called so we facetimed! That means we are both on a camera so we could see each other as we talked! Wonderful!

But back in about the seventies, a prediction was made that in the future we’d be able to talk on our phones–live! Oh, no, I thought! What if my house was messy! What if I looked bad, like I wasn’t dressed up! My hair might be a mess! I thought it was a bad idea! But the prediction came true and I love it! I love facetiming with my grandchildren and my children and even friends!

Yes, the telephone has come a long way from when it was first invented! But we still answer with “Hello?”

 

 

 

 

Jerry and His Toys

Jerry, like all men, has had his toys! I’ll start here in the very early 50’s! He was a teenager and didn’t like mowing the grass any better than the other boys. So he got to work and made himself a riding lawn mower! No one had riding mowers back then! jerry-mowing-lawn-rider-late-40s-2When we were young, if you wanted something, you either made it or you saved your money and bought it with cash!                                                                                                                  A few years later, at the lake, he saw folks waterskiing! He could do that…he knew he could, if he just had a boat! So…he worked and saved his money

jerry-boat-1955-2 Here is Jerry with his boat he saved for! He became a very good skier and had a great time with his friends! Years later, he taught all five of our children and even some of their friends to waterski!boat-jerry-1980-2 This is at Wixom Lake, north of Midland.  In about the middle 70’s he bought this nice boat so our children could learn to waterski. Jerry is standing in the boat, Tim is sitting, and Robby is in the water, wanting to climb into the boat! I can’t, for the life of me, think who the girl is! We spent many fun hours at Wixom Lake, Higgons Lake, Lake Margarite, and a few others! All five of our children became very good water skiers!    Just…not me!

One day, in the early 2000’s, our son, Ted, called Jerry on the phone. He had the chance to buy a ’69 MG B, but with his young family, he just couldn’t buy it! The price was right! Would Dad like to buy it? It’s the first and only time Jerry ever bought anything without looking it over and driving it, first! Yes, he bought the MG sight unseen! IMG_2008_07_04_9533 - ASF

He loved his little MG! He still has it but he doesn’t drive it anymore.

Jerry bought this Wheel Horse tractor about 35 years ago! He still uses it today but only for plowing, mainly snow or sometimes dirt. He used to mow our grass with it but now it’s too much work to take the plow off and put the mower on, then later, take the mower off and put the plow back on. It’s a big job.  I bought a trailer for the Wheel Horse one year and gave it to Jerry for Christmas. I hid it in the neighbor’s garage and Jerry had to find it! He still has the trailer, too. This is what he plows the snow with in winter. Although now, our good neighbor plows our snow with his truck and all he wants for pay, is a pie from me!

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So he bought his new John Deere for mowing!

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Jerry on his new John Deere

Jerry loves his John Deere tractor!

Life keeps moving on! The years have taken their toll! He can’t play or work like he used to! But mowing with his John Deere is something he can do and he does.

Life has been good! Jerry has accomplished a lot in his lifetime. He loves God first, then me, and then our five children.

 

 

 

A Worthwhile Project

A fact, hard for me to admit, is that we’re aging. Jerry is 80! I’m 77! Us, 2015 This is the latest picture of us taken, as you can see, at Christmas time, 2015. We’ll celebrate 57 years of marriage next month! Jerry has always been a very hard worker, but those days are pretty much gone now. These days we are enjoying life in our log home. Our wonderful children come to visit and tackle jobs that they see need to be done. We also hire men to do work now and then.

Spring has arrived, birds are returning. We have bird feeders in our back yard that we watch when we’re sitting in our sun-room. But we’re in our living room a lot of the time and wish for birds to watch there.

So Jerry  got an idea. Project Jerry 1 It was a lot of work. Project Jerry 2  It’s beginning to take shape! IMG_1879  He filled the old cream can with pieces of cement and dirt. Project Jerry 6  Then he put this heart shaped hanger in the center of the can and hung a bird seed bell! Now we can sit in our living room or on our front porch and watch the birds come and eat the seeds. These were all things we already had so we only had to buy the bell bird seeds.

So come on, birds! We’re ready!

Small Isn’t All Bad – Less Is More

I love books. I love reading. I have actually read all night long when I was reading a novel I just

couldn’t put down! This shows a portion of my collection of books. I have favorite authors, of course. Grissom, Blackstock, Rivers, Williamson, just to name a few! Glen Williamson was my dad! I have all his books!

I’ve now reached the age I didn’t really think would ever arrive! Old Age! I need to downsize! Oh no, does that mean, get rid of my precious books?

I’ve done it! I’ve downsized my books! I’ve given many away! Some to family, some to friends here,  some to friends in far away places!

There is an organization that takes Christian books and makes them available to missionary workers and families. Christian Resources International is where boxes and boxes and boxes of my books, for all ages, went! It wasn’t so hard to give them away when I knew they were going to people who would read them and love them and be helped by some of them and who couldn’t, otherwise, get them! And they’ll be going all over the world!

I no longer have my book shelves in my reading room. I no longer have my reading room! We’ve moved the shelves upstairs to the loft. So here is my reading corner!

I even had room for some antique games and toys from Jerry’s childhood days. A Roy Rogers coloring book! Monopoly, a jar of Marbles, Dominos, Tinker Toys, and a game of Conflict. The beautiful doll was a gift from my daughter, Pam, years ago, but not an antique yet! The parasols are from Taiwan.

New Library

So the downsizing has begun! My books, for the most part, are alphabetized by the author.

Book case 1 These are  some antique books I can’t part with. Some are: Dick and Jane readers, I started out learning to read, in Des Moines, Iowa. Jerry and Alice readers, Friendly Village and If I Were Going, I had in Covington, Oklahoma.

Jerry made this bookcase when he was in high school in the early 50’s! On top of the bookcase is the Singer sewing machine my mother received as a gift when she was a teenager. She made all my clothes and my sisters on this machine! A darning bulb is beside the sewing machine. Mother taught me to darn socks with it! Today, of course, we throw  holey socks away and buy new!

Having grandchildren, I have to save some of my kid books. I gave a lot of them away but I kept some favorites. Most of them were my own kids books when they were young.

The Bremen-town Musicians I have read to all of my grandchildren. They got to hold the statue of the Rooster, Cat, Dog, and Donkey while I read the book to them. They loved it and begged to have me read to them over and over!

So, the next stage of downsizing needs to begin. Oh dear…